About us

OUR VISION
THE BEGINNING
THIS PROJECT AIMS TO BRING TO LIFE THE STORIES OF REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS WHO HAVE HAD TO FLEE THEIR HOME COUNTRIES DUE TO POLITICAL UNREST, WAR AND PERSECUTION.

The people behind this project came together in a Brighton-based Meetup group, Help Refugees Prosper. We started talking about how we could work together to break down the barriers and misconceptions that make people in the UK afraid or wary of refugees and migrants.

Over the past year we have been collecting stories, photos, poems, recordings and video footage for this project. Through sharing these with a wider audience, we hope to make our community a more tolerant, welcoming and accepting place for refugees coming to settle in this country.

Outside of our close-knit team, we have also received lots of positive encouragement from family and friends, including contributions from photographers Sergey PonomarevRob Pinney and Jenny Matthews, as well artist Joanna Layla. A big thank you goes out to you all, this wouldn’t have been possible without your involvement.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DOCUMENTING
THE REFUGEE CRISIS
YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED THAT WE HAVEN’T USED ANY PHOTOS THAT CAN IDENTIFY PEOPLE. THIS HAS BEEN A CONSCIOUS AND COLLABORATIVE DECISION, MADE WITH OUR CONTRIBUTORS AND BASED ON A NUMBER OF ETHICAL REASONS.

The Dublin III regulation is an EU law which states that anyone seeking asylum must do so in the first ‘safe’ country they enter. In these times of mass global migration, this is obviously not practical. It would mean that Greece and Italy – where the majority of refugees enter Europe – would be overwhelmed with millions of people.

Therefore there is a very real danger that showing the faces of those seeking asylum could potentially affect their claims: if there was ‘photographic proof’ of them having been in another European country, their claims could be denied.

There is also a fear that people could be identified and ‘found’ by the governments of the countries they are fleeing. This would put the individuals themselves at risk, and also any family members still remaining in their native country.

Lastly, a lot of the people who find themselves in these conditions, are ‘ashamed’. They are people with hopes and dreams the same as ours, and they don’t want to be ‘defined’ (visually, or otherwise) as refugees to the rest of the world.

So by not showing their faces, we are preserving people’s safety, privacy and – most importantly – their dignity.

Over the past year we have been collecting stories, photos, poems, recordings and video footage for this project. Through sharing these with a wider audience, we hope to make our community a more tolerant, welcoming and accepting place for refugees coming to settle in this country.

OUR TEAM
dominic_main_profile
Dominic Port
petra_main_profile
Petra Kopp
merlin_mainprofile
Merlin Nation
clare_main_profile
Clare Struthers